Census Predicts Whites Will Be Minority In US By 2044

In the U.S. the white share of the population is declining as Hispanic, Asian and black populations grow.

A Pew Research report may indicate that this trend is occurring more quickly than some have anticipated.

According to a Pew report released April 8, between 2000 to 2013, 78 counties in 19 states went from majority white to counties where there is no clear racial majority:

    Overall, 266 of these 2,440 counties are less than half white. However, many are in urban areas that together account for about one-third (31%) of the nation’s population, despite making up just 11% of U.S. counties with a minimum population of 10,000. These counties are concentrated in California, the South and the East Coast, bypassing much of the country’s middle section.

This is especially true for America’s big cities:

    In 19 of the 25 biggest U.S. counties by population, whites make up less than half of the population. Of these, six that were majority white in 2000 are no longer so: San Diego, Orange, Riverside and Sacramento counties (all in California), plus Clark County, Nev., and Broward County, Fla.

According to a recent Census report, white children will be outnumbered by minority kids in only five years, a shift due mostly to immigration.

By the year 2020, 50.2percent of all children in the US are expected to be non-white, according to the Census. By 2044, whites will be outnumbered by minorities.

As National Geographic reported, the Census is also changing categories since more people are trending toward not defining themselves as black or white:

    The U.S. Census Bureau has collected detailed data on multiracial people only since 2000, when it first allowed respondents to check off more than one race, and 6.8 million people chose to do so. Ten years later that number jumped by 32 percent, making it one of the fastest growing categories. The multiple-race option has been lauded as progress by individuals frustrated by the limitations of the racial categories established in the late 18th century by German scientist Johann Friedrich Blumenbach, who divided humans into five “natural varieties” of red, yellow, brown, black, and white.

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